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​​Adaptive Brain Computations


Welcome to the website for the Adaptive Brain Computations project.


Adaptive Brain Computations (ABC) is a European Community Seventh Framework Initial Training Network.


The purpose of the ABC project is to integrate the study of learning and brain plasticity in order to promote wellbeing and advance healthcare interventions.


Adaptive interactions within the environment depend on sophisticated multi-level brain plasticity mechanisms from single neurons to large-scale brain networks. However, traditionally, the study of plasticity has been fragmented into sensory, motor or decision-related circuits.


The ABC project takes a multidisciplinary approach, utilising methods from physiology, cellular neurobiology, ​pharmacology, brain imaging, behavioural science and computational modelling to integrate these different disciplines.


ABC consists of 8 partners across Europe that are training 14 early career researchers to understand how learning modifies sensory representations, perceptual decisions and motor outputs. We are also examining cortical re-organisation and long-term plasticity in cases of congenital or acquired sensory and motor deficits.

​The work being carried out by ABC has impact in the development of assistive technology for the education and rehabilitation of individuals who have been impaired by stroke or other sensor deficits. In addition the work has benefit in improving techniques for early diagnosis, improved prognosis and effective interventions which can be informed by a better understanding of brain plasticity.​






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